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Is your practice protected from data breaches and cyber attacks?

Veterinary practices are as much of a target for cyber crime as any other business. Cyber criminals across the globe are preying on vulnerable business computer networks. Cyber criminals study email correspondence, looking for holes in the way organizations are currently operating.

They’re finding new opportunities to target employers who are now implementing new protocols and procedures. They’re even baiting curious and anxious employees with phony websites impersonating healthcare or government organizations and then inserting malware into their business network. Veterinary practice owners must be more vigilant now than ever.

Is your practice protected?

9 Ways a Data Breach Policy
Protects Your Practice

1

Cyber Breach Event Expenses

Example: An employee clicks on a link that seems legitimate, but then notices computer slowness and suspicious pop-ups. There is no IT resource internally to help.

A cyber insurance policy will provide legal, computer forensics, and other event response expenses to provide assistance and determine the cause of the malicious activity.

2

Social Engineering

Example: A practice manager orders a new piece of diagnostic equipment online. An invoice is later received that appears legitimate, and the practice manager transfers funds to this new equipment vendor. Days later, the manager realizes the mistake, but the funds are gone from the account.

Social engineering coverage provides reimbursement in the event of a transfer of funds due to deceptive communications directing them to do so.

3

Cyber Extortion

Example: An employee is responding to emails from multiple third parties, including one that appears to be from the company that invoices pet owners. The employee clicks on an attachment, and the computers are locked. A message appears demanding Bitcoin (approx. $50k USD) in order to unlock the computers.

Cyber insurance provides coverage for the response to the incident – including any forensic expenses – and the remediation of extortion, including facilitation and reimbursement of payment, where insurable.

4

Reputational Loss

Example: A cyber extortion incident shuts down a practice for two weeks. It is determined that payment card information was stolen during the incident. The local news media reports on the story. When the practice is back up and running, their revenue decreases by 25%.

Cyber policies will respond to an adverse media report following a breach, indemnifying insureds for lost revenues as a result.

5

Business Interruption

Example: A veterinary practice uses an electronic record-management system. The system malfunctions and is no longer accessible. The practice is unable to operate normally and loses revenue as a result. The practice later learns that the outage was due to a breach of the system.

Lost revenue reimbursement as a result of a breach or outage is available as part of cyber policies.

6

PCI-DSS Fines and Penalties

Example: Payment cards are compromised as a result of a breach of the payment system utilized by the veterinary practice. After an investigation, it is determined that the practice was not compliant with the data security standards imposed by the Payment Card Industry. Fines and penalties are assessed.

If a breach occurs and compliance is in question, the insurance policy will respond to the investigation and any fines and penalties that result.

7

Digital Asset Restoration

Example: A veterinary practice utilizes data backups, but only on a bi-weekly basis. A breach occurs just before the system is backed up, resulting in two weeks of lost data, including patient and treatment details, payment information, and payroll records.

The extra expense that results from recreating or restoring data is covered under the cyber insurance policy.

8

Regulatory Proceedings

Example: A veterinary practice computer system is breached, resulting in personal information (including financial information) being stolen. The veterinary practice delays notifications and does not follow the format required by the state statutes. An attorney general proceeds with an investigation.

Cyber insurance will respond with the costs to defend against an investigation, and provide indemnification for fines and penalties, where insurable by law.

9

Media Liability

Example: A veterinary practice has a special event in conjunction with an animal shelter. An employee takes photos and collects information about the pet owners who stop by. Photos are posted on social media, and a lawsuit is tendered alleging that proper permission was not granted.

Media liability will cover the contents of a veterinarian’s website and social media if complaints occur. Covered allegations include copyright infringement, plagiarism, invasion of privacy, and defamation.

Is your practice protected?

Data Breach and Cyber Resources

Blog: Fighting Cyber Crime

Cyber criminals study email correspondence, looking for holes in the way organizations are currently operating. They’re finding new opportunities to target employers who are now implementing new protocols and procedures. They’re even baiting curious and anxious employees with phony websites impersonating healthcare or government organizations and then inserting malware into their business network. 

With the ever present – and increasing risk – learn these seven items every veterinary practice must do to help protect their business. 

Read the Blog

Blog: Cybersecurity for Veterinary Practices

Cyber attacks and ransomware are once again in the news, and veterinary clinics aren’t exempt from the impact of cracks in digital security. Threats include privacy breaches, extortion, lost data, and more. This isn’t a topic veterinary professionals can afford to ignore.

Learn from Isaac Monson, assistant vice president and senior risk consultant at HUB International, and Erik Bernstein, president of Bernstein Crisis Management, Inc., to find out how to put smart safeguards in place and what to do if you come under attack.

Read the Blog

Webinar: Cyber Solutions for Your Practice

What you'll learn:

  • How social engineering can negatively affect practices
  • The dangers of ransomware and what questions to ask to protect your practice
  • How portable devices like laptops and phones can invite danger
  • Where to find additional resources to guide your practice

Webinar Speakers:

  • Dr. Nina Mouledous, AVMA Trust Veterinarian
  • Emily Selck, Senior Vice President, Cyber Liability Practice Leader, Hub International
  • Jesse Miller, Chief Information Security Officer, Stratosphere Networks
Watch the Webinar

AVMA Resource: Online Reputation Management and Cyberbullying

From bad reviews to cyberbullying, veterinarians – like other small business owners and professional service providers – are at risk of coming under attack in cyberspace. And if it happens, it can be both emotionally distressing and disruptive to your business. But it’s not cause for panic – it’s cause for monitoring and maintaining your online presence, and double-checking your basic business practices to make sure they stand up to scrutiny.

In this primer, learn the many things you can do to limit your risks, as well as ways to prevent or minimize damage if you do come under attack. 

Learn More

Is your practice protected?

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